?

Log in

D O D E C A H E D R O N [entries|friends|calendar]
Dodecahedron

[ website | Dodecahedron ]
[ userinfo | livejournal userinfo ]
[ calendar | livejournal calendar ]

[04 Sep 2003|08:30pm]

opopanax
So...What are we waiting for?
2 comments|post comment

article [25 Aug 2003|06:40pm]

brilliantchaos
I finished my article on self-help books.

Self-Help Books: Lies or Lifesavers?

Mention the phrase "self-help book" to a random passerby on the street, and you'll probably get a groan, a strange look, or even a laugh. Over the years, self-help books have been branded by an often-false label; as worthless, new-age books promising a better life in "JUST FIVE DAYS!". In truth, not every self-help book on the shelf is packed with lies. Some actually offer helpful suggestions for raising your quality of life and learning to be happy in a given situation.

The best example I can give is Og Mandinos A Better Way to Live. Don't let the title deceive you into thinking this book is a load of falsehoods. Within the book, you'll find 17 guidelines that may help improve your lifestyle. The author suggests trying to follow just one as closely as possible a day. When 17 days are up, you go back and start again. Over time, the "rules" all blend together and you find yourself following them by habit. Tips like "Whenever you makea mistake or get knocked down by life, don't look back at it too long" and "You will achieve your grand dream, a day at a time, so set goals for each day- not long and difficult projects, but chores that will take you, step by step, toward your rainbow" are just some of the suggestions he gives to becoming a more patient, happy and succesful human being.

The author himself has a self-help story to tell; he went from a broke man on the streets to a motivational speaker through his own personal drive to succeed. This isn't some rich businessman looking to make some extra money by feeding on people's needs to improve their lives. This is a man who has been in the worst possible situation and was able to use the tools he shares in his books and speeches to climb back up.

Many people may be familiar with 7 Rules for Highly Effective Teens by Stephen R. Covey. This book also shares suggestions aimed at teens for a more effective, happier lifestyle. It's a common assumption that teens are "searching for themselves" and trying to dig deeper to see just who they really are. While some teenagers may find this generalization completely untrue in their own lives, others really are trying to figure out where they want to be in life. For those, self-help books like 7 Habits... could be extremely useful in determining their path or just helping them get more organized.

Loko at yourself in the mirror, and ask yourself if there are areas in your life you wish you could improve on. Few people wouldn't be able to come up with an answer. For the majority of us, we can find weakness in our work or social habits, our organizational skills, our ability to forgive or loosen up or just enjoy a cloudless day. And for these aspects of our personality that are less-than-perfect, self-help books are here to teach us how to work on those. Find one that meets your specific needs. Read about the author. Does he have a main profession in motivational speaking, psychology, or any other trustworthy career? You're very likely to find a book that won't scream "LIES!" and will genuinely help you. So take a deep breath, and pick that book off the shelf. You may surprised on how you've changed once you're finished.

-Alison C.
http://vibe.paphian.org

If you do put this article in your zine, I ask that my website be printed along with it, if that's all right.
2 comments|post comment

[23 Aug 2003|04:52pm]

laceinspace
lol...this is a funny community...i'm the last person who posted and that was to tell people i was at camp. well i'm back now. i'm writing a summary/analysis of My Antonia for summer work from my school so i'm thinking instead of doing a book review i'll submit my essay for dodec.
-Lacey
post comment

[14 Aug 2003|01:13pm]

laceinspace
Hey everyone! i'm at camp right now...in sunny Idyllwild, Ca., so i rally haven't had time to decide what specific job i would want for Dodec. i can't remember if Anna said this was going to be an internet newletter or a paper one becasue i am really good and putting together newletters and putting labels and stamps on them...i did that for my Sunday School. i did start writing a book review for the book My Anotnia by Willa Cather. i had to read it for school. i hope that it will go in a future edition of dodec. Talk to you all later.
-Lacey
post comment

Hi! All about me... [09 Aug 2003|01:33pm]

caile
1. What are three of your favorite books and why do you like them so much?

The Emperor's Babe, by Bernadine Evaristo - I'm a sucker for novels in verse, and this one is about a streetwise daughter of African immigrants to the Roman outpost town of Londinium who gets married off against her will to an old, fat Roman.
Howl's Moving Castle, by Diana Wynne Jones - This is the best book ever involving a hat shop, an evil wizard and the poetry of John Donne. And it makes you wish there were more books in that category.
Catch-22, by Joseph Heller - Ah, such complex dark humour...

2. What particular genres (fantasy, romance, sci-fi, etc.) do you read the most?

Fantasy. If there's a dragon on the cover, I've probably read it. Also I read a lot of historical detective fiction (such as stuff by Ellis Peters, Lindsay Davis, Elizabeth Peters or Dorothy Sayers.)

3. What is a book that you absolutely hated and why didn't you like it?

Wuthering Heights, by Emily Bronte. It is dark, dreary and depressing, but it's got this sudden completely happy ending that comes out of nowhere. I can never understand why people think it's a classic.

4. What are five to ten authors whose books you really like?

Diana Wynne Jones, Terry Pratchett, Steven Brust, Alister MacLeod, Tove Jansson, Gordon Korman

5. What do you consider to fall into the catagory of "children's literature"? What about "YA literature"?

I think people are too concerned by categories that are only neccessary for shelving purposes. Children and young adults ought to be allowed to read whatever they want, and too often people in authority use those categories to keep young readers from books that are supposedly too mature. I think no one should be discouraged from reading.

At the age of 7, I was secretly reading my dad's thriller novels. Those books were full of graphic sex and imminent nuclear meltdowns -- but I didn't catch any of the sex or a lot of the plot points until re-reading the books many years later. I was absolutely petrified by fear of worldwide nuclear disaster for a while, though.

That said, I can tell children's/YA books from adult books when I read them -- and I still do love reading them.

6. What are the last three to five books that you read for pleasure and, briefly, what did you think of them?

The Burning of Bridget Cleary, by Angela Bourke - A wonderfully detailed non-fiction account of a grusome murder & subsequent trial in rural Ireland in 1895. The participants blamed the killing on the fairies. The book examines the clash of belief systems in an even-handed way that is so refreshing to see.
The Last Unicorn, by Peter Beagle - Meh. Overrated.
The Red Tent, by Anita Diamant - A retelling of a Bible story, from a woman's perspective. And without the god bits. Plus her description of ancient life is so vivid I'd swear she's been there.

7. Would you have any problem with writing up semi-detailed coverage on any books you read (synopsis, comments, recommensation, etc.)
No.

8. Why do you want to help out with Dodecahedron, how much time can you put into it, and how long do you think that you'll be able to help out?

I already write book reviews, and inflict them on my friends. Right now I have a lot of spare time, but I'm hoping to have less in the near future.

9. What kind of "job" would you like to have with Dodecahedron - reading, reviewing, articles, interviews, etc. (put down whatever comes to mind - everyone has brilliant ideas, no matter how cheesy they may sound).

I have some ideas for reviews - how about reviews of books translated into English from other languages (like Tove Jansson's Moomin series, or Roch Carrier's "The Hockey Sweater")?

10. Please tell me anything else you'd like me to know - it doesn't have to be books related and could be written in list style for all I care. +smile+

Am I really the oldest person on here? Oh dear... Apart from books, I love: being a radio dj, cooking, travelling, cats, arguing about the nature of the universe, writing and dancing.

11. What is your name (first with last initial), birthday (month/day/year), and location (city, state/province, country)?

Joyce M., 08/10/79 (yes, 24 tomorrow), Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

12. What is your e-mail address?

joysaint@hotmail.com
1 comment|post comment

Hi my name is Patrick....... [07 Aug 2003|09:08am]

flagpolesitta
[ mood | good ]




1. What are three of your favorite books and why do you like them so much?

You Are Special by Max Lucado, Sergio Martinez (Illustrator) -
I have never read this book actually, it was read to me and the rest of a group at a religious retreat. This book is just fab though. Aside from being a rather amazing metaphor for Christianity, it also is very well illustrated and a greatly written children's book. Go check it out.

Curfew by Phil Rickman
It's just an amazingly well written horror novel. Your basic good vs. evil scenario plunged into the England-Wales borderlands. If you like horror fiction or just books where theres more plot then gore, you might wanna locate a copy. Or ask me to borrow mine.
I can share. :o)

The Phantom Tollbooth - Norman Juster
I too was in this play, as an extra and stage crew. I finally got around to reading the book this year and loved it. The scene where Milo conducts the colors alone is worth the reading of this book. Go grab a copy.

2. What particular genres (fantasy, romance, sci-fi, etc.) do you read the most?
Like my man Andrew I don't normally fly towards one genre...unless "comic books" is a genre. :o)
Otherwise my taste tends to focus on urban fantasy (Neil Gaiman, Elizabeth Ann Scarrbough), horror (Stephen King, Phil Rickman), humorous sci-fi and fantasy (Terry Pratchett, Douglas Adams) and whatnot. *nods*

3. What is a book that you absolutely hated and why didn't you like it?
Er....I don't hate. A book I highly dislike is Superstitious by R.L. Stine.
R.L. Stine attempts to write good adult fiction and fails horribly. A decent mystery gets thrown into a blender with a horror novel concept John Saul would turn down and is set to puree. The result? An ill flavored concoction that should be destroyed.
Avoid this book.

4. What are five to ten authors whose books you really like?
Neil Gaiman, (Sandman, American Gods, Neverwhere)
Terry Pratchett, (Guards! Guards!, Hogfather, Soul Music)
Douglas Adams, (The Hitchikers Guide To The Galaxy five part trilogy, the two book Dirk Gentley saga [Dirk Gentley's Holistic Detective Agency and The Long Dark Tea Time of the Soul)
Harlan Ellison, (Shatterday)
Chris Van Allsburg, (The Mysteries of Harris Burdick, The Wretched Stone , Jumanji, The Z Was Zapped : A Play in Twenty-Six Acts, The Polar Express)
Dr. Seuss, (The Lorax, Horton Hears a Who, Hop on Pop, Green Eggs and Ham)
Mark Waid (Kingdom Come)
Grant Morrison (JLA: American Dreams, New X-Men : Imperial)
David Wiesner (Tuesday, June 29, 1999)
and Dave Barry (Sooooooo many books including Big Trouble and Tricky Buisness and numerous essay collections.)

5. What do you consider to fall into the category of "children's literature"? What about "YA literature"?
Childrens literature is books that deal with concepts designed for and understandable to children.
Young adult is stuff designed for teens and all the shit they deal with during adolescence.
As such I think childrens books can be enjoyed by a whole range of people while young adult for the most part tends to only appeal to its target audience, since it has such a specific subject matter.

6. What are the last three to five books that you read for pleasure and, briefly, what did you think of them?
Well, fell free to check out my list....
Anyhoo, counting backwards:
23, Grant Morrison & various illustrators - New X-Men: Imperial
A fascinating revamping of one of the greatest comic books ever. A must read for fans of the X.
22, Dr. Seuss - Daisy-Head Mayzie
A tounge twister and a half, I've been reading this out during story hour. Kids reactions are mixed while I think its a fairly amusing book.
21, Douglas Wood & Doug Cushman - What Teachers Can't Do
A cute kids book showing how teachers have limitations too. Always a nice thing for kids to understand.
20, Ken Wilson-Max - L Is for Loving: An ABC for the Way You Feel
An alaphet of emotions. This book has great accompying illustrains to really make things understandable, but deals with some really big words considering its designed for little kids. A good read none the less.
19, David Wiesner - The Three Pigs
Not Dave's best but still pretty cool. The illustraitions really sell it. And it's about time the pigs beat the wolf!!

7. Would you have any problem with writing up semi-detailed coverage on any books you read (synopsis, comments, recommensation, etc.)
No of course not. Everyone who knows me says I never shut up. :o)

8. Why do you want to help out with Dodecahedron, how much time can you put into it, and how long do you think that you'll be able to help out?
I'll help out with whatver writing you want me to do, As You Like, The Bookshelf, Book Reviews, The Top Five, whatever.
I can put in alot of time and I'll help out as long as possible.

9. What kind of "job" would you like to have with Dodecahedron - reading, reviewing, articles, interviews, etc. (put down whatever comes to mind - everyone has brilliant ideas, no matter how cheesy they may sound).
As I said before, writing stuff. I love to write.

10. Please tell me anything else you'd like me to know - it doesn't have to be books related and could be written in list style for all I care. +smile+
uh.....I'm Patrick. I read comic books. And I'm cool. :o)
11. What is your name (first with last initial), birthday (month/day/year), and location (city, state/province, country)?
Patrick J, 11/13/83, Prairie du Sac, Wisconsin, USA
12. What is your e-mail address?
whistle_monkey@hotmail.com

Have a nice day y'all.

Peace out,
-Weird Beard

6 comments|post comment

Dodecahedron Update [05 Aug 2003|02:04pm]

alethiometer
[ mood | drained ]

Dear Everybody,

Today I am going to try to get a better idea of who is doing what. To this end, THIS is the post to respond to about what job you would like. Please give me some variety and be aware that compromises are going to have to be made.

Now, as to available jobs:

Specific Pages:

There are going to be some subject-specific pages: a creative writing page, a non-fiction page, a spotlight page, and a reader's page. And by page I mean either a single 8.5 x 11 page or a double spread, whatever works out better.

Creative Writing Page: short stories (printed in installments, most probably), poetry, etc.

Non-Fiction Page: though the rest of the newsletter will be devoted to fiction, mainly because most of what is read between the ages of 8 and 18 is fiction, I think that it would be bad to *completely* overlook this genre. To this end we have the Non-Fiction Page. Reviews of books (maybe one for younger readers and one for older readers) as well as anything else deemed worthy.

Spotlight Page: Where we can highlight a specific author, a specific book, a specific subject, etc. Probably best as a double spread. Reviews, special top five list, etc. all possible.

Reader's Page: Probably not worth having in the very first issue. This is where reader's letters/comments/recommendations/etc. will (hopefully) go. Contact information for the newsletter goes here as well. :-)

All of these pages need people to be in charge of them. If you are in charge of a specific page then you are in charge figuring out content, writers, etc. Everything still needs to be run by me but you're a middle person so that I don't get overwhelmed by talking to everyone about everything.

The Bookshelf:

This is another full-page feature but one that I absolutely want to have. Basically it would be the last or second to last page of the newsletter, filled with about 10-15 blurbs on books of all types (possibly ranked by age range). Blurbs will be made up of short descriptions of the story, a sentence or two of evaluation and, in parentheses, the number of pages and age range. The Bookshelf will be a place to mention books that were good but maybe weren't interesting enough to write full reviews about, or that we just didn't have space for or whatever.

For this page we need someone to coordinate the effort, someone to keep track of what's being written about by whom. Pretty simple really.

Non-Writing:

I'm sure I've told basically everyone by now that I would like for each person to write at least a little something, but that does not mean that the only things involved with putting Dodecahedron together are writing things.

Reader: You read. And then you read some more. And then, for a change, you read even more. You read what you want to read and post short comments afterwards on the community LJ (in a little while I'll make a list of questions to answer after reading a book). The comments, however, don't have to be formal which is why I'm saying that this is a non-writing thing, I hope that makes sense.

Proofreaders: Anyone can help proofread but I would like to have one or two people who really know their stuff when it comes to grammar. These persons will check the nearly-finished newsletter after everyone else has already had a go.

Little Features:

The Top Five: Looks like there are a lot of people really interested in doing this, but probably two at the most. Lists of five really good books on a particular subject or of a particular genre. With an introduction before the list and sentence summaries of the books mentioned.

As You Like It: Completion of the sentence "If you liked ___ by X then you will also enjoy ___ by Z." Both books mentioned should have one to two sentence summaries.

Poll: A book/author related question to be responded to by newsletter readers via e-mail. Some of the more creative responses may or may not be published in the following issue. Questions should be mulit-dimensional as opposed to simple "yes or no" types.

Trivia: A little box with some literary trivia, probably in the form of "Did you know...?"

Upcoming: A littl box with a list of soon-to-be published books that will be worth attention from readers. I might just take charge of this one myself, since I've been doing this in my mind for ages, but I thought I'd put it out there anyway.

That's it for now - I'll write more about general jobs tomorrow, but in the meantime I would appreciate it if you all could do two things:

1. Make a "comment" reply to this post if you are interested in any of the above jobs. Tell me why you want it, what you would plan to do with it, etc.

2. Make a separate post outlining any additional pages, jobs, etc. that you can think of.

Cheers,
Anna
xoxo

7 comments|post comment

Survey [04 Aug 2003|09:06pm]

lhaw_en_edhel
[ mood | excited ]

1. What are three of your favorite books and why do you like them so much?
~The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas -- I loved the complexity of the characters' background, and the multiple conflicts.
~The Silmarillion by J.R.R. Tolkien -- being a major Tolkien fan, and this being my favorite of all the Tolkien books I've read, how could I not place it on my favorite books list? ;) But seriously, it's incredibly interesting, and is so jam-packed with information. There's romance, history (of a fictious world, that is), action, adventure all put together.
~In the Time of the Butterflies by Julia Alvarez -- It's one of the few books ever to make me cry. The characters are well portrayed, and it just emotionally draws in the reader.

2. What particular genres (fantasy, romance, sci-fi, etc.) do you read the most?
Usually fanatasy, though I've read many great historical fiction novels

3. What is a book that you absolutely hated and why didn't you like it?
The Yearling by Majorie Kinnan Rawlings -- It's four hundred pages (at least the publication I was reading) and in my opinion, a fluffed up novel about a boy and his pet deer. One of the few books I ever fell asleep on while reading. And it's quite tedious how the author doesn't use any synonym for "said."

4. What are five to ten authors whose books you really like?
~J.R.R. Tolkien
~Madeleine L'Engle
~Robin McKinley
~Lois Lowry
~Nancy Farmer

5. What do you consider to fall into the catagory of "children's literature"? What about "YA literature"?
Well, usually I figure out the age group based on the protagonists' age. If the protagonist is an elementary school kid, then I'd say it's children's literature. Picture books would also be children's literature. Coming-of-age books would be YA literature.

6. What are the last three to five books that you read for pleasure and, briefly, what did you think of them?
~The Bardic Voices Series by Mercedes Lackey -- consisting of The Lark and the Wren, The Robin and the Kestrel, The Eagle and the Nightinglaes, and Four and Twenty Blackbirds, this series was really fun to read. Each book has a different adventure concerning different characters, so the reader never gets sick of one character
~Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy -- Some great bits on society, and human nature, and Tolstoy himself, but other bits were quite boring.

7. Would you have any problem with writing up semi-detailed coverage on any books you read (synopsis, comments, recommensation, etc.)
No problem at all, though I can't guarantee if they'll be of good quality writing.

8. Why do you want to help out with Dodecahedron, how much time can you put into it, and how long do you think that you'll be able to help out?
Well, I've been wanting to work on newspapers or magazines for a while, and this sounds like a great chance. I can work on this about a couple hours a week when school starts, and maybe a bit more, depending on how easy my teachers will be. I'll stick with this for as long as you need me to.

9. What kind of "job" would you like to have with Dodecahedron - reading, reviewing, articles, interviews, etc. (put down whatever comes to mind - everyone has brilliant ideas, no matter how cheesy they may sound).
I'll work on the polls, and some trivia. I can proofread as well, if needed. As for writing, I'm willing to write some non-fiction books or anthology commentary, and some reviews for books for younger kids, since I have an 8 year old brother, and a handful of cousins in the 7-11 age range.

10. Please tell me anything else you'd like me to know - it doesn't have to be books related and could be written in list style for all I care. +smile+
I'm obsessed with Tolkien, and I won't trade in my books, or DVDs, or CDs for anything. And...that's about it, basically...

11. What is your name (first with last initial), birthday (month/day/year), and location (city, state/province, country)?
Eva C.; Sept 24, 1989; Boston, MA, US

12. What is your e-mail address?
At the moment, it's elf_eared_dudette@yahoo.com, but that may be changing since it's been bogged down. If it's not working, try googolplexave@earthlink.net.

2 comments|post comment

Dodec reader survey [04 Aug 2003|02:03pm]

laceinspace
[ mood | geeky ]

1. What are three of your favorite books and why do you like them so much?
A Ring of Endless Light by Madeline L'Engle (sp?) i guess i like is so much because the writing style is so simple, and yet the characters are real people with real problems. and when she writes her imagry is so beautiful...i love it.
To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee i love this book because i think that it teaches people some very important life lessons. i also like it because each time i read it i get a different meaning out of it. and i love the characters, esp. atticus and cal, and the sleepy-town setting.
Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut. this is an absolutley hysterival book. i laughed so hard when i was reading this. and i also love it because it has some really great quotes.
2. What particular genres (fantasy, romance, sci-fi, etc.) do you read the most?
i suppose i read a lot of realistic fiction...does that make sense? fiction that is set in the present with characters that could possibly be real people in real places and real situations. but lately i've been getting into a lot more fantasy. i just completed his Dark Materials and i loved it. and i basically like almost anything i read.
3. What is a book that you absolutely hated and why didn't you like it?
1984 and Animal Farm by George Orwell i hate his style of writing. plus i hated the whole story lines that were presented in the books. and i know the books are supposed to be anti-communist, but i still hated the way Orwell conveyed the message and the way he cohse to write his books.
4. What are five to ten authors whose books you really like?
Megan McCafferty
Sarah Dessen
Jane Austen
Kurt Vonnegut
Phillip Pullman
Tolkien
5. What do you consider to fall into the catagory of "children's literature"? What about "YA literature"?
Children's lit is something i hate to discuss cause i never really read children's lit. i was alway a bit ahead in my reading so i just read whatever i could get my hands on. but if it has good illustrations in it...then it's worth reading....hehe ;)
YA i consider any book a young person can put their hands on, whether it's classified as YA or adult. if they read it and enjoy it...then i consider it YA.
6. What are the last three to five books that you read for pleasure and, briefly, what did you think of them?
The Amber Spyglass Phillip Pullman--what an absolutley wonderful finish to one of the best trilogies i've ever read. the ending was so sad and yet so hopefull. the whole trilog was fabulous
I Capture the Castle Dodie Smith--this book is so romantic and sweet and beautiful that it is really almost like a modern fairytale. cassandra is such a loveable heroine and her journals are very real. evryone should read this book.
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix J.K. Rowling--what can i say???? it was fabulous...but still not my fave.
7. Would you have any problem with writing up semi-detailed coverage on any books you read (synopsis, comments, recommensation, etc.)
no, i do it already on my LJ
8. Why do you want to help out with Dodecahedron, how much time can you put into it, and how long do you think that you'll be able to help out?
I'll be able put in a fair amount of time on the weekends...but i'll probably have a lot of work from school...so maybe a few hours a week
9. What kind of "job" would you like to have with Dodecahedron - reading, reviewing, articles, interviews, etc. (put down whatever comes to mind - everyone has brilliant ideas, no matter how cheesy they may sound).
i like reviewing books that i've recently read
10. Please tell me anything else you'd like me to know - it doesn't have to be books related and could be written in list style for all I care. +smile+
-i live in LA, but i'm going to high school in Pennsylvania
-the George School Cougars rock!
-i love books
-i love baseball (go NY Yankees!)
11. What is your name (first with last initial), birthday (month/day/year), and location (city, state/province, country)?
Lacey M., Feb. 23, 1987, Los Angeles, CA. (currently), but Newtown, PA when school starts
love, Lacey

4 comments|post comment

[04 Aug 2003|01:00am]

disarm
[ mood | sleepy ]

Hi guys :)
Quite excited about getting to work on Dodecahedron with all of you.

Here's me:

1. What are three of your favorite books and why do you like them so much?

+Celestina or The Sixth Sense by Malgozhata Muserovich is definitely a favorite [although I'm not at all sure its ever been translated into English]. Muserovich does an incredible job crafting the characters of the novel, which is what made it different from all the other teen soul-searching books I've read. Growing up in Russia connected me a lot to the everyday life described in the book: the hot water outages, cramped living space, etc. I don't think I've ever read anything that was more real to me in both feelings and setting alike.

+Hard Love by Ellen Wittlinger also hit close to home with John's attitude on life, like opening a door. The last paragraph is priceless, and I'd post it here but I don't want to spoil anything for anyone that may want to read it later on.

+To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee is a favorite probably because of the realism with which every scene was described. Life in a quiet, dusty town where kids look for mysteries in neighbors' houses but are always home on time for dinner. I used to do that :)

2. What particular genres (fantasy, romance, sci-fi, etc.) do you read the most?

I don't generally like to lock into a single genre. To many books on a similar topic make my head go fuzzy :) Lately I've been reading a decent amount of fantasy and sci-fi, but really, as long as the book's good... :)

3. What is a book that you absolutely hated and why didn't you like it?

Night by Ellie Wiesel (sp?), although it was the concept, not the book. My english teacher made us do an indepth study of the Holocaust when I read it. She was the kind of person that loves the gruesome details, and my final project for the semester was a visual poster on Nazi medical experiments. After doing all the research I could hardly finish the book, and definitely could not eat or sleep for a while after finishing. I know in a sense it was necessary to read it, but I think it went a little over the top for me.

4. What are five to ten authors whose books you really like?

Orson Scott Card
Arthur Conan Doyle
Maya Angelou
Francesca Lia Block
Phillip Pullman
Kir Bulychev

5. What do you consider to fall into the catagory of "children's literature"? What about "YA literature"?

Unfortunately, I think the corporate understanding of children's lit currently seems to be "the stupider, the better!" To me, children's lit are good hearted almost fairy-tale-happy books that make the child feel comfortable in and with the world.

As for YA literature, I think it should ease the child out of fairytales and introduce him or her to the real world, how other people may deal with issues that he or she is having, etc.

6. What are the last three to five books that you read for pleasure and, briefly, what did you think of them?

A Walk to Remember [Nicholas Sparks] - wonderful, romantic book, but I was a little confused by the very last paragraph in a "so did she or did she not?!" sort of way. Still haven't seen the movie, either.

Ender's Shadow [Orson Scott Card] - although extremely well written, I didn't think it one of his best. Having gotten through 3 or 4 books written mostly from Ender's perspective it was hard to adjust to one of a shadow character. The transition was done spectacularly though. (is spectacularly even a word?)

The Lovely Bones [Alice Sebold] - wonderful, beautifully written book. I don't cry at books often, really, but this was most definitely it.

Xenocide and Children of the Mind [Orson Scott Card] - these two tend to run together in my brain as I read them over a week or so and one is a continuation of the other. Some of his best philosophical work though, right on par with Speaker for the Dead.

7. Would you have any problem with writing up semi-detailed coverage on any books you read (synopsis, comments, recommensation, etc.)

Not at all.

8. Why do you want to help out with Dodecahedron, how much time can you put into it, and how long do you think that you'll be able to help out?

It's a very neat idea, first of all. Second of all, I'm part of my school's literary magazine, and I've been trying to get them to open up a book review section for over a year, which they refuse to do. So yeah, here I am :) I'll be able to help out as long as you need me to, and as for time, I'm honestly not sure right now but if i have deadlines to work around I should be all set.

9. What kind of "job" would you like to have with Dodecahedron - reading, reviewing, articles, interviews, etc.

I'd like to help out with layout, but I would be okay with proof reading, writing, or just reading really. Anything goes.

10. Please tell me anything else you'd like me to know - it doesn't have to be books related and could be written in list style for all I care. +smile+

Hm. I hoard books :D I absolutely refuse to give up any I've bought and my current book case is on the verge of collapse because of it. And I'm Russian, not that it makes that much difference. :)

11. What is your name (first with last initial), birthday (month/day/year), and location (city, state/province, country)?

Irina S., or Ira for short *but* its pronounced [ee-rah], because when people call me [eye-rah] I have a tendency to bite off bodyparts. 11/13/87, Shrewsbury, Mass, US.

12. What is your e-mail address?

autumnleaf @cheerful.com is what I use most, but it's been down a lot lately, so camerachild @mail15.com works as well.

post comment

Eve's (blenrock's) Introduction [04 Aug 2003|12:09am]

blenrock
[ mood | excited ]

Hi, everyone! I’m excited to be a part of Dodecahedron, and I look forward to getting to know everyone else who’s involved! Here are my answers to the survey questions:

  1. What are three of your favorite books and why do you like them so much?

    1. Godel, Escher, Bach: an Eternal Golden Braid by Douglas Hofstadter. This is an absolutely fantastic book that discusses some of the most interesting occurrences in mathematics, music, and art. Hofstadter explains what he refers to as “strange loops” in a brilliant manner. He breaks up technical discussions with cute dialogues, in which the characters experience firsthand many of the more technical aspects of the book.

    2. House of Leaves</i> by Mark Z. Danielewski. Like Godel, Escher, Bach, this book is put together in a unique, creative way. At its core, the book is a piece written by a blind guy about a documentary on a terrifying house. But at the same time, another guy is reading through this piece, adding footnotes as he reads, often as much about his life as his thoughts on the piece about the house. Plus, you follow the life of the creator of the documentary and his family. Definitely the most original book I’ve ever read.

    3. The Man Who Loved Only Numbers by Paul Hoffman. This is a biography of the famous mathematician Paul Erdos. He was quirky and eccentric, which makes his life interesting, and his mathematical contributions were impressive beyond belief. Hoffman’s portrayal of Erdos as both a mathematician and a man is presented in a fascinating, engaging manner.


  2. What particular genres (fantasy, romance, sci-fi, etc.) do you read the most?

    Honestly, I read a lot of non-fiction. I love biographies and memoirs, especially of people who have experiences either similar or diametrically opposed to mine. I enjoy books about math (and occasionally science) that are written for a general audience, as well as though written for people expected to have a strong background in math. I’m actually somewhat embarrassed at how much I like the former, considering that I’m usually capable of getting through the latter.

    I read lots of fiction too, but I can’t say that it usually falls within a particular genre.

  3. What is a book that you absolutely hated and why didn't you like it?

    I hope I don’t immediately make several hundred enemies by saying this, but I could not stand the first Harry Potter book (and haven’t read any since). I’ll admit that my expectations may have been a bit too high going into it, but it simply didn’t hold my interest. I didn’t connect to any of the characters and I found the plot simply too unrealistic to enjoy. I tried to suspend my disbelief, but I couldn’t. Usually I don’t have that problem; I loved Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe when I was younger, and I’m sure if I picked them up now, I still would. But Harry just doesn’t do it for me.

    I also didn’t like Grapes of Wrath. The descriptions of all the dust and whatnot were torturous beyond belief. I’ve enjoyed the other Steinbeck books I’ve read though. Another (yes, I know you only asked for one… sorry) book I despised that most people seem to enjoy was Catcher in the Rye. Holden annoyed me and the tone of the book quickly got on my nerves.

  4. Who are five to ten authors whose books you really like?

    When I read a book I like, my first impulse usually isn’t to find other books by the same author and read them. For that reason, there aren’t terribly many authors who’ve written more than one or two books that I’ve read. Let’s see what I can come up with:

    • Margaret Atwood
    • Marcel Proust
    • Keith Devlin
    • Kurt Vonnegut
    • Douglas Hofstadter


  5. What do you consider to fall into the category of "children's literature"? What about "YA literature"?

    I’ve never thought much about this. Books are so nicely categorized at libraries and at bookstores. There’s never been much of an opportunity for me to decide whether something ought to be considered children’s literature, young adult literature, or otherwise. However, I’m pretty certain that it would be intuitively clear to me after reading the book, if not simply after flipping through it. Children’s literature is often characterized by simple language, a plot without confusing twists, a clear beginning, middle, and end, and predictable characters. The line between young adult literature and general literature can be fine at times, but it’s usually safe to say that a book with relatively simple language and characters with whom young adults can identify can be called young adult literature.

  6. What are the last three to five books that you read for pleasure and, briefly, what did you think of them?

    1. A translation of The Reader by Bernhard Schlink. It was short and held my interest, though I was disappointed with the ending. Actually, the entire second half of the book was disappointing after the first half.
    2. The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky. This is one of my good friend’s all time favorite books, and he encouraged me to read it. Though it could definitely be considered a young adult book, I thoroughly enjoyed it. Some aspects of the main character’s life weren’t entirely believable, but I liked him nevertheless.
    3. The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold. It was okay. Didn’t exactly live up to the hype, but I still liked it.

      All three of the above are very quick reads.


    Currently, I’m reading (and enjoying)

    1. Bobos in Paradise by David Brooks
    2. The DaVinci Code by Dan Brown
    3. Proofs from THE BOOK by Martin Aigner and Gunter M. Ziegler


  7. Would you have any problem with writing up semi-detailed coverage on any books you read (synopsis, comments, recommendation, etc.)

    No, I can’t imagine I’ll have difficulty completing any of the above.

  8. Why do you want to help out with Dodecahedron, how much time can you put into it, and how long do you think that you'll be able to help out?

    Dodecahedron sounds like an awesome project, and I’ve never really been involved with any literary publications. It’s more than just broadening my horizons though. I’m honestly interested! For the rest of the summer, I can probably put a lot of time (several hours per day, if necessary) into it. Once I start college in September, I can’t really say. I don’t have a good sense of how busy college life will be just yet.

  9. What kind of "job" would you like to have with Dodecahedron - reading, reviewing, articles, interviews, etc. (put down whatever comes to mind - everyone has brilliant ideas, no matter how cheesy they may sound).

    I’d love to help proofread and edit, and I’d also be more than willing to write anything that needs to be written.

  10. Please tell me anything else you'd like me to know - it doesn't have to be books related and could be written in list style for all I care. +smile+

    I like math. A lot. =)

  11. What is your name (first with last initial), birthday (month/day/year), and location (city, state/province, country)?

    Name: Eve D.
    Birthday: 10/19/84
    Location: Fair Lawn, NJ until September 6. After that, I’ll be in Cambridge, MA.

  12. What is your e-mail address?

    It’s probably best to e-mail me at blenrock@livejournal.com because that will automatically be forwarded to the address I’m using with LiveJournal. If, for whatever reason, I stop having a paid account at some point, that address will no longer be valid. In that case, try eve@claymath.org (the address I currently check most often) or edrucker@fas.harvard.edu (the address that will likely become my primary address in the near future).
post comment

[03 Aug 2003|05:00pm]

opopanax
1. What are three of your favorite books and why do you like them so much?

Kurt Vonnegut's Slapstick- Vonnegut is one of the greatest writers who ever lived, and this is my favorite piece by him. The main thing I love about it, and all Vonnegut's books, is his unique ability to be funny and sad at exactly the same time. It's like reading 1984 with one eye and a joke book with the other.

The Strange Case of Dr.Jekyll and Mr.Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson- What a marvelous book. It's an excellent, timeless story, and one of the first to really delve into the world of psychology.

Skeleton Crew, Stephen King- I love King's books, but his short stories are infinitely better, and this collection is the best.

2. What particular genres (fantasy, romance, sci-fi, etc.) do you read the most?

That's a tough one, because I don't really focus on a particular genre, just ideas an authors. Although I do have a soft spot for the comic book style books, one of the sub-sections of Sci-fi. Anything that has a good superhero in it is okay by me.

3. What is a book that you absolutely hated and why didn't you like it?

The last book I remember hating is Fahrenhiet 451. It's odd though, because I love Bradbury, and I know 451 is a great book, I just can't bring myself to like it. Something about the way it's written, I suppose.

4. What are five to ten authors whose books you really like?

Kurt Vonnegut
Stephen King
Douglas Adams
Alfred Hitchcock
Peter Benchly
H.P. Lovecraft
Oscar Wilde
Rod Serling

5. What do you consider to fall into the catagory of "children's literature"? What about "YA literature"?

Children's Lit either has to be something with a clear and simple moral, that doesn't shock the reader too much, or something so stupid only the brain of a child could find it amusing.

As for young adult, anything that deals with the same issues as teenagers deal with.

6. What are the last three to five books that you read for pleasure and, briefly, what did you think of them?

Vonnegut's Timequake-Great book, read it in a single sitting due to time constraints, and I don't feel I wasted the day.

Vonnegut's Bluebeard-One of his absolute best, amazing book.

Stephen Walker's Danny Yates Must Die-Absolutely absurd, which is great if you're into that kind of thing. Walker's clearly been heavily influenced by Douglas Adams, but manages to sound like him without ripping him off.

7. Would you have any problem with writing up semi-detailed coverage on any books you read (synopsis, comments, recommensation, etc.)

No.

8. Why do you want to help out with Dodecahedron, how much time can you put into it, and how long do you think that you'll be able to help out?

I want to help because I think it's a smashing idea. I can put in as much time as you need and help for as long as you need me too, seeing as how it's over the internet.

9. What kind of "job" would you like to have with Dodecahedron - reading, reviewing, articles, interviews, etc. (put down whatever comes to mind - everyone has brilliant ideas, no matter how cheesy they may sound).

I'd prefer to stick with proofreading, but I'm a renaissance man.

10. Please tell me anything else you'd like me to know - it doesn't have to be books related and could be written in list style for all I care. +smile+

I'm good for now.

11. What is your name (first with last initial), birthday (month/day/year), and location (city, state/province, country)?

Andrew S., 12/16/84, Kelowna, BC, Canada.

12. What is your e-mail address?

Plaid_king@hotmail.com
post comment

Oy vey... [02 Aug 2003|08:35pm]

alethiometer
[ mood | satisfied ]

1. What are three of your favorite books and why do you like them so much?
For variety's sake I will count the entire His Dark Materials trilogy as one book. Written by Philip Pullman these books have been my very favorite since I first read The Golden Compass in 1997. Pullman an amazing writer whose characters and worlds come to vibrant life every time one reads his books. It has gotten to be difficult to peg down exactly why I love these books so much - is it the idea of a daemon? is it the mind opening ideas that are presented? is it the combination of fantasy and realism in such a skilled way? is it something else all together? Pretty much, though, they are my basis of all literary comparisons that I make (I just try not to compare too often).
Another book that I love is Pride & Prejudice, by Jane Austen. Even though it was written so long ago the story is one that can be enjoyed thouroughly by modern readers. I've always wanted to be like Elizabeth Bennett, so witty at every turn and able to be herself no matter how different that made her. On top of that, she's really quite smart! And of course there's Mr. Darcy, who is probably one of the most attractive men ever created in literature.
Finally, a third book that I love to bits and pieces is This Lullaby, by Sarah Dessen. Lots of people to compare McCafferty to Dessen, and I can see why - they both are amazingly good at capturing the trials and tribulations of the teenage years within their writings. In my opinion, This Lullaby is the best of Sarah Dessen's books so far (all of which are good, just so you know). Remy is an amazingly complex character, written in a way that makes her feelings felt by readers themselves.

2. What particular genres (fantasy, romance, sci-fi, etc.) do you read the most?
Fiction in general. I'm not big on romance and I only read the higher quality, less cliche fantasy and science fiction stories. I am a complete sucker for any and all books written in diary/letter format. I read mostly realistic fiction but can get into most anything.

3. What is a book that you absolutely hated and why didn't you like it?
Oh god...Ragged Dick by Horatio Alger. I will always like a book for what it is, even if I read it in school. This book was the only one on my 11th grade reading list that I couldn't deal with. In fact, I can't believe that I got through it at all! Probably only because my English/History teacher isn't someone to mess with. In short, the story is cliche, the writing of the lowest quality, the dialouge insipid, and the point non-existant. I can't see how it was even relative at the time of its publication!

4. What are five to ten authors whose books you really like?
Philip Pullman, Tamora Pierce, Roald Dahl, Jane Austen, Cornelia Funke, Meg Cabot, Darren Shan, Megan McCafferty, Avi, and Anthony Horowitz.

5. What do you consider to fall into the catagory of "children's literature"? What about "YA literature"?
The line is blurry, first of all, because nothing is ever that simple (make sure to watch DONNIE DARKO). The quality of the writing is immaterial. There are beautifully written children's books just as there are beautifully written YA books. The subject matter is really the defining charactaristic. Ideas that are more complex are usually found in YA literature. Also, quite obviously, YA literature can openly contain sex, drug, and alcohol references whereas children's literature cannot for "sheltering" purposes. Then again, books such as Tuck Everlasting are both simple and complex and amazingly beautiful so where do you put those? Basically, here's how I see it: it will always depend on the individual reader. Nothing is clear cut and simple, and classifying books hinders their appeal.

6. What are the last three to five books that you read for pleasure and, briefly, what did you think of them?
I recently finished a book called Quadehar the Sorcerer by a French writer named Erik L'Homme. Fairly decent, though certainly not spectacular. It took me a long time to figure out why the combination of interesting characters, an original setting, and an exciting quest wasn't turning out to be as impressive as it usually does: there's not enough detail! A shame, really.
Before that, I read all four of the Alex Rider books written by Anthony Horowitz (Stormbreaker, Point Blanc, Skeleton Key, and Eagle Strike). These books are absolutely fantastic! Boys and girls of all ages will enjoy them - younger readers because they're good adventure stories, older readers because they'll get into the psychological parts of the stories and understand a lot more of the jokes and James Bond spin-offs (which are openly intentional so there's no issue of Horowitz ripping off Fleming). I highly recommend them all, though I don't think Eagle Strike is out in the US yet.

7. Would you have any problem with writing up semi-detailed coverage on any books you read (synopsis, comments, recommensation, etc.)
Quite obviously not - I do it informally all the time!

8. Why do you want to help out with Dodecahedron, how much time can you put into it, and how long do you think that you'll be able to help out?
Now I just feel silly answering these questions.... I want to help out with Dodec. because it was my idea and is now under my supervision. I can put quite a bit of time in to it since I'm a loser who dropped out of public high school so as to go back to homeschooling. I will stay with the project for as long as it is running.

9. What kind of "job" would you like to have with Dodecahedron - reading, reviewing, articles, interviews, etc. (put down whatever comes to mind - everyone has brilliant ideas, no matter how cheesy they may sound).
First off, I'm the E.I.C. by default and that's proving to be work enough. However, I also have a poll question, book review and Top Five list ready to go should they be useful AND I am planning on writing an article about what makes the H.P. books so amazing and popular and why it's difficult to emulate them. I'm going to do as much as I can in each one month time span.

10. Please tell me anything else you'd like me to know - it doesn't have to be books related and could be written in list style for all I care. +smile+
-I want to study history in college
-I think Lord Asriel and Mrs. Coulter and Lyra and Will should be played by Colin Firth, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Keisha Castle-Whatsit (the girl from "Whalerider") and Jamie Bell, respectively. In the movie of "The Golden Compass," that is.
-I was introduced to Alan Rickman the other day. Yes, the Alan Rickman.
-I want to go to NYU, but might take a year off between "graduation" and my first year of college. This will be esp. true if I can get a position at a NY publishing house. :-)
-I love baseball with every fiber in my being
-And finally yes, I do think that The Princess Diaries is an absolutely hysterical book - I mean, c'mon, Norman the Foot Fetishist??? *lol*

11. What is your name (first with last initial), birthday (month/day/year), and location (city, state/province, country)?
Oy vey....
Anna H., 07/14/1986, London, England, UK (current)/Oakland, CA, USA (usual)

12. What is your e-mail address?
For Dodecahedron stuff: dodec_bks@yahoo.com
For other stuff: letsgoas04@yahoo.com

.....

Thank god that's out of the way. Sorry if I was a bit long winded - I actually kind of like surveys, though obviously they're better when someone else has come up with the questions. Oh well.

Cheers,
Anna H.
xoxo

1 comment|post comment

[03 Aug 2003|02:36pm]

davezfave
1. What are three of your favorite books and why do you like them so much?
1 & 2 are sloppy firsts and second helpings by megan mccafferty. i know it seems like that's all us girls read today, but it's the truth. when i read these books, i realized that i AM jessica darling, and i'd like to strive to be her in any way that i'm not. she is the most realistic character in a book i have ever read. i can't put these books down. i'd rather re-read them for the eighth time than do my summer reading :P
#3 would have to be the sun also rises by ernest hemingway, mainly because i love the language. everything just sounds so beautiful and perfect even when it really wasn't.
2. What particular genres (fantasy, romance, sci-fi, etc.) do you read the most? realistic fiction, and the occasional lord of the rings ;)
3. What is a book that you absolutely hated and why didn't you like it? frankenstein by mary shelley. i feel so awful for saying that, but it was just not for me at all. it dragged on and on. there were no breaks.
4. What are five to ten authors whose books you really like? this is tough, because there are so many authors. megan mccafferty of course, ernest hemingway, dave eggers, and so many more. at the moment i'm stumped. so i'll get back to you.
5. What do you consider to fall into the catagory of "children's literature"? What about "YA literature"? i'm really not sure how to answer this. the book that i've written, called mapsurne, is trying to bridge that gap. it's really difficult to define the difference between children's and young adults. they're all enjoyable for anyone who wants to read them.
6. What are the last three to five books that you read for pleasure and, briefly, what did you think of them? i read a book called hunger point, though i don't remember the author. it was pretty good, at times i couldn't put it down. the family life was so realistic that you could feel it. i also tried to get into white teeth by zadie smith for my own enjoyment, but that didn't quite work out too well for me. i'm not so good with the focus on a male character. as for other books, i can't remember back that far. i'm trying to get myself back into reading again.
7. Would you have any problem with writing up semi-detailed coverage on any books you read (synopsis, comments, recommensation, etc.) nope, not at all.
8. Why do you want to help out with Dodecahedron, how much time can you put into it, and how long do you think that you'll be able to help out? hopefully i can put a good amount of time into it, but i'm not sure how that will work out. it's my senior year, and i know it can get kind of crazy. i want to be more involved in literary criticisms, etc. because i myself have written a book, and i need feedback.
9. What kind of "job" would you like to have with Dodecahedron - reading, reviewing, articles, interviews, etc. (put down whatever comes to mind - everyone has brilliant ideas, no matter how cheesy they may sound). reading, reviewing, interviews- i'd do it all. i also love editing. my grammar needs work too, but hey, doesn't everyone's?
10. Please tell me anything else you'd like me to know - it doesn't have to be books related and could be written in list style for all I care. +smile+ i can do anything, promise.
11. What is your name (first with last initial), birthday (month/day/year), and location (city, state/province, country)? call me krista k, born on june 19th, 1986 (i'm a fabulous gemini). i'm from good old new jersey, not too far from jessica darling herself.
12. What is your e-mail address? davezfave@aol.com
1 comment|post comment

[03 Aug 2003|02:20pm]

brilliantchaos
1. What are three of your favorite books and why do you like them so much?
Book #1: Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky. I like this book so much because it's written in a refreshing, modern way. The book is in letter forms and is about a freshmen boy whose figuring out life, mainly. It's simple and artistic and has some stellar lines like "and at that moment, I swear we were infinity."
Books #2 and #3: Sloppy Firsts and Second Helpings by Megan McCafferty. These two books (Second Helpings is the sequel to Sloppy Firsts) are as real-life teenage as they get. Through the eyes of the teen-angsty Jess, you experience high school life, with it's trivialities, pains, and disappointments firsthand. It's completely relatable and an easy read.
2. What particular genres (fantasy, romance, sci-fi, etc.) do you read the most?
Mainly realistic fiction and chic lit.
3. What is a book that you absolutely hated and why didn't you like it?
Even though I haven't finished it, I strongly dislike A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess. I set out to read it because it's a classic, but in reality it's just about a group of horrible kids in a futuristic England who rape girls, rob random strangers for the fun of it, and get high. It's supposed to be about the redeemal of one of them, but I didn't get that far. It's slow and it's horrible to read what these kids do to others.
4. What are five to ten authors whose books you really like?
Megan McCafferty, Stephen Chbosky (though he only has 1), Chuck Palhniuk (sp?), Mercedes Lackey, Francesca Lia Block, Lois Duncan
5. What do you consider to fall into the catagory of "children's literature"? What about "YA literature"?
Chilren's literature to me are books that range between 75-200 pages. Easy, simple reads that can be found in the Juvenile Fiction section that are chapter books but don't contain a particularly deep message. YA literature are books geared towards middle and high schoolers, usually with a more adult message; they might address sex, drugs, and smoking, amoung other things. The page range can be extensive; though most tend to stay in the 300 range. I prefer adult novels on a whole, but YA are good as well.
6. What are the last three to five books that you read for pleasure and, briefly, what did you think of them?
Lullaby by Chuck Palhniuk: very good. It addresses the idea of a culture where sound can kill. It also makes a large point that our culture thrives on noise of all kinds, and puts forth the message that maybe we should all slow down a little.
Hole in my Life by Jack Gantos: it was all right. I liked that it was non-fiction, however it was the generic tale of a good boy who goes bad, ends up in jail, and redeems himself.
Read between the Lies by ?: A story of three high-power women and how their lives entertwine. Excellent beach read, not hard to follow, and entertaining.
Eddie and Bella by Wayne Wilson: The characters sometimes get confusing because they pop in and out at odd intervals and they're all depressing people with bland lives, but the storyline itself is very interesting.
7. Would you have any problem with writing up semi-detailed coverage on any books you read (synopsis, comments, recommensation, etc.)
Not at all.
8. Why do you want to help out with Dodecahedron, how much time can you put into it, and how long do you think that you'll be able to help out?
The school year is bound to be hard, and I won't be getting home till late on most nights. However, I'd like to help out as much as I can, though it might not be on a month-to-month basis. I'd be happy writing articles (I have an idea for one now) and book reviews, and submitting them as often as possible.
9. What kind of "job" would you like to have with Dodecahedron - reading, reviewing, articles, interviews, etc. (put down whatever comes to mind - everyone has brilliant ideas, no matter how cheesy they may sound).
I'd like to start off by writing an article on self-help books, and I'd be happy to review current books that I read, and maybe every so often comprosing Top 5 lists.
10. Please tell me anything else you'd like me to know - it doesn't have to be books related and could be written in list style for all I care. +smile+
Can't think of anything right now.
11. What is your name (first with last initial), birthday (month/day/year), and location (city, state/province, country)?
Alison C, July 29, '89, North Carolina (I don't give out city, sorry)
12. What is your e-mail address?
beautyinmymadness@hotmail.com - subject to change
10 comments|post comment

Dodecahedron Notice #4 [03 Aug 2003|01:22pm]

alethiometer
[ mood | optimistic ]

Dear Everybody,

Hello again! The weekend is almost over, which means I won't be able to spend such an insane amount of time on the computer. Not to worry, however, because I will still be able to keep up with the goings on of Dodecahedron. I'm really happy about the amount of interest my posts have been generating. Here, in brief, are updates:

1. Inquiring minds want to know: why on earth is the name of a geometric shape being used as the name of a literary newsletter?

Here's the deal: in 1996, when I was almost 10-years-old, I was in a play called "The Phantom Tollbooth," based on the novel of the same name by Norton Juster. I played two characters: the Spelling Bee and the Dodecahedron. That was how I learned what I dodecahedron is and why I use the name for the newsletter - I like the way it sounds, the way it's spelled, and just the overall uniqueness of it. :-) BTW, if you haven't read The Phantom Tollbooth you definitely should.

P.S. The play was a total disaster, but I was excellent as the Spelling Bee. *grin*

2. There are now two Dodecahedron LiveJournal communities!

The first is at dodec and was created with the help of the glorious blenrock, who also did the super cool avatar. This community is for those of us who are working on the newsletter itself and will be used as a discussion area etc. You have to be invited to join, and to be invited you have to have expressed serious interest in helping out with Dodecahedron. I really don't want it to get clogged up with inactive members. But if you want to help, just let me know.

The second is at this_lullaby and it will be an open community for anyone who wants to discuss literature for 8 to 18 year olds. The URL will be listed in actual issues of Dodecahedron and pretty much anyone will be able to post. However, at this point posts will be monitored becuase of the targeted age range. :-/ BTW, the screen name for this community comes from the excellent book by Sarah Dessen. :-)

3. What's the plan for the coming week?

Well, now that we've gotten people interested in working on the newsletter it's time to start taking more definite steps towards getting everything to come together. :-) I know, easier said than done. The main goal of this coming week (8/4 - 8/10) will be to figure out what everyone wants to do. At the same time I will be working on a better, clearer, easier to read website. ALSO, people working on Dodec. should fill out the Reader's Survey posted on dodec, since that will help us all get to know one another better in a literary sense. Filling out the survey isn't urgent, but I would like to get it done by the end of the week. Finally, once everyone is hooked into dodec we're going to have to set some deadlines. I myself HATE deadlines with a passion (it's part of the reason I'm homeschooled!) but it is true that in this case they will probably - gasp! - help. So we all have to decide on things like when we want the final product done by, when we'll need to have contributions written by, etc.

That's really it for now. Remember to ask any and all clarifying questions - I don't think I'm being clear enough and don't want to have anyone confused.

Cheers,
Anna
xoxo

post comment

Dodecahedron Survey [03 Aug 2003|12:39pm]

alethiometer
Dear Everybody,

First off, thanks to blenrock for setting up this community for those of us who are going to be working on Dodecahedron. Hopefully this will make it a lot easier to us to all work together. At least, that's the plan. :-)

Second, you're probably wondering about the title of this post. Well, I have a survey that I would love to have all of you people fill out - I'm really interested to know more about who I'll be working with, an intrest I'm sure everyone else shares. SO, with that in mind, I've come up with a survey. I'll be filling it out ASAP, probably later today. Could the rest of you please try to get it done sometime this week? It's not that long or difficult - really the main point, besides satisfying my curiosity, is to let me know the literary tastes each of you have.

Please post your answers as individual posts for clarity's sake. :-)

1. What are three of your favorite books and why do you like them so much?
2. What particular genres (fantasy, romance, sci-fi, etc.) do you read the most?
3. What is a book that you absolutely hated and why didn't you like it?
4. What are five to ten authors whose books you really like?
5. What do you consider to fall into the catagory of "children's literature"? What about "YA literature"?
6. What are the last three to five books that you read for pleasure and, briefly, what did you think of them?
7. Would you have any problem with writing up semi-detailed coverage on any books you read (synopsis, comments, recommensation, etc.)
8. Why do you want to help out with Dodecahedron, how much time can you put into it, and how long do you think that you'll be able to help out?
9. What kind of "job" would you like to have with Dodecahedron - reading, reviewing, articles, interviews, etc. (put down whatever comes to mind - everyone has brilliant ideas, no matter how cheesy they may sound).
10. Please tell me anything else you'd like me to know - it doesn't have to be books related and could be written in list style for all I care. +smile+
11. What is your name (first with last initial), birthday (month/day/year), and location (city, state/province, country)?
12. What is your e-mail address?

So there you go - please answer those questions at some point during the next week.

Cheers,
Anna H.
xoxo
post comment

navigation
[ viewing | most recent entries ]